SCENES FROM FORGOTTENTOUR #64, Cobble Hill, Carroll Gardens

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On Sunday, April 21, 2013, nearly 35 ForgottenFans gathered for a tour in Cobble Hill and Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn and with sunny, 55 degree conditions, the recent weather winning streak for FNY tours continued going back to most 2012 tours. The title card shows the crowd at the WWI War Memorial in Carroll Park.

The Cobble Hill, Boerum Hill, Carroll Gardens and Gowanus neighborhoods, arrayed south of Atlantic Avenue from 3rd avenue west to the east River and north of the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway and Gowanus Canal. Each are relatively distinct: Cobble and Boerum Hills, comprising the few blocks south of Atlantic Avenue east or west of Smith Street respectively, feature block after block of Brooklyn’s most expressive and diverse residential architecture. Cobble Hill is Brooklyn’s second-largest Italian-American enclave after Bensonhurst, while rough and ready Gowanus, closest to its namesake canal, is the former haven of the Mohawk Indians who worked on Manhattan’s skyscrapers in the 30s till the 60s and beyond.

We circled through Cobble Hill and Carroll Gardens, seeing some of the quirky aspects and historic locales of this neighborhood on the rise, though we did regret the demise of the St. Clair Diner on Smith and Atlantic, which had hosted the postgame show on previous tours.

See this flickr page for tour photos and identifications. All photos by Robert Mulero.

For information on future tours, call Greater Astoria Historical Society at 718-278-0700, email me at erpietri@earthlink.net or GAHS at info@astorialic.org.

5/1/13





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One Response to SCENES FROM FORGOTTENTOUR #64, Cobble Hill, Carroll Gardens

  1. John Guerrasio says:

    Hi

    You make me home sick for Brooklyn. I’m an American ex-pat living in London. I grew up in the “Neighborhood With No Name” aka Greenwood Heights. I then lived in Carroll Gardens. I’ve been a fan of Forgotten New York for many years. BTW I met a taxi driver in London who worked in the Brooklyn Navy Yard during WW2 customizing the ships built there for British use. He told me most of the British workers lived in small hotels along 4th avenue.

    Be well,
    John

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